Biotechnology Training Courses at the National Institutes of Health
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BIO-TRAC

FAES/NIH
Building 10
Room 1N241 -
MSC 1115
Bethesda, MD
20892-1115

301-496-8290

 

TRAC 22: Hybridization Techniques: Labeling, Detection and Applications

This 4 day course is designed to introduce the participant to molecular hybridization and in situ hybridization techniques.  The application of these techniques to current research questions in genetics and gene expression, molecular pathology, and pathogen detection and identification will be discussed.  Probe application and detection systems will serve as the basis for both RNA and DNA in situ hybridization techniques to be addressed in lecture and laboratory.  This course will be staffed by clinical and basic scientists familiar with the applications of hybridization techniques to the problems of human disease.

Topics: Probe Design, Optimization, and Application at the Chemical and Cytological Levels; Principles of Hybridization; Base Structure, Modification, Stability and Specificity; Hybridization Kinetics; Preparation of Chemical and Cellular Samples; Hybridization Formats: Target Abundance vs. Probe Abundance, Spots/ Blots, Southern and Northern Analysis, Soluble Targets, in situ Hybridization; Radioactive, Biotinylated, DNP, Chemoluminescent and Oligonucleotide Probe Synthesis, Purification and Use; Label and Signal Amplification and Hybridization Accelerators.  DNA in situ hybridization (FISH); Interphase Molecular Cytogenetics; RNA in situ Hybridization; RT-PCR in situ Hybridization; Principles of Karyotyping and Metaphase Chromosome Preparation; Tissue and Specimen Preparation Fixatives, Comparative Genome Hybridization; Spectral Karyotyping; Fluorescence Microscopy; and in situ PCR.

FOUR DAY COURSE
TRAC 22
April. 14-17, 2014
Monday - Thursday
REGISTER
TIME

9:00 - 5:00 p.m.

28 lecture/lab contact hours
FEE
$795 (Lecture & Laboratory)
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Biotechnology Training Courses at the National Institutes of Health
Sponsored by the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences